MarvaoGuide
Travel Guide to Eastern Europe
 
Eastern Europe Travel Guide   
MarvaoGuide.com - Travel Guide to Central and Eastern Europe
You are here: Eastern Europe Travel arrow Moldova arrow Brief History of Moldova Republic  
 
Print E-mail

Brief History of Moldova Republic



 

The Republic of Moldova occupies most of what has been known as Bessarabia. Moldova's location has made it a historic passageway between Asia and southern Europe, as well as the victim of frequent warfare. Greeks, Romans, Huns, and Bulgars invaded the area, which in the 13th century became part of the Mongol empire. An independent Moldovan state emerged briefly in the 14th century under celebrated leader Stefan the Great but subsequently fell under Ottoman Turkish rule in the 16th century.

After the Russo-Turkish War of 1806-12, the eastern half of Moldova (Bessarabia) between the Prut and the Dniester Rivers was ceded to Russia, while Romanian Moldavia (west of the Prut) remained with the Turks. Romania, which gained independence in 1878, took control of Russian-ruled Bessarabia in 1918. The Soviet Union never recognized the action and created an autonomous Moldavian republic on the east side of the Dniester River in 1924.

In 1940, Romania was forced to cede Bessarabia to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.), which established the Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic by merging the autonomous republic east of the Dniester and the annexed Bessarabian portion. Stalin also stripped the three southern counties along the Black Sea coast from Moldova and incorporated them in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic. Romania sought to regain Bessarabia by joining with Germany in the 1941 attack on the Soviet Union. On June 22, 1941, German and Romanian troops crossed the border and deportations of the Jews from Bessarabia began immediately. By September 1941, most of the Jews of Bessarabia and Bukovina had been transported in convoys and force marched to concentration camps in Transnistria. About 185,000 Jews were in the Transnistria area in concentration camps by 1942 in abysmal conditions. Very few were left alive in these camps when the Soviets reoccupied Bessarabia in 1944.

In September 1990, the Supreme Soviet elected Mircea Snegur as President of the Soviet Socialist Republic of Moldova. A former Communist Party official, he endorsed independence from the Soviet Union and actively sought Western recognition. On May 23, 1991, the Supreme Soviet renamed itself the Parliament of the Republic of Moldova, which subsequently declared its independence from the U.S.S.R.

In August 1991, Moldova's transition to democracy initially had been impeded by an ineffective Parliament, the lack of a new constitution, a separatist movement led by the Gagauz (Christian Turkic) minority in the south, and unrest in the Transnistria region on the left bank of the Nistru/Dniester River, where a separatist movement declared a "Transdniester Moldovan Republic" in September 1990. The Russian 14th Army intervened to stem widespread violence and support the Transnistrian regime which is led by supporters of the 1991 coup attempt in Moscow. In 1992, the government negotiated a cease-fire arrangement with Russian and Transnistrian officials, although tensions continue, and negotiations are ongoing. In February 1994, new legislative elections were held, and the ineffective Parliament that had been elected in 1990 to a 5-year term was replaced. A new constitution was adopted in July 1994. The conflict with the Gagauz minority was defused by the granting of local autonomy in 1994.

 
 

Search Hotels

Check-in date

Check-out date

Advertisement
 

Menu
Eastern Europe Travel
Albania
Austria
Belarus
Bosnia
Bulgaria
Croatia
Czech Republic
Estonia
Hungary
Latvia
Lithuania
Macedonia
Moldova
Montenegro
Poland
Romania
Serbia
Slovakia
Slovenia
Turkey
Ukraine
Backpacking
World travel
Eastern Europe car hire
Advertisement
TOP 25 Eastern Europe
Vienna
Prague
Budapest
Sofia
Ljubljana
Riga
Dubrovnik
Warsaw
Bratislava
Bran Castle
Kotor
Berat
Cesky Krumlov
Bardejov
Belgrade
Budva
Sarajevo
Košice
Tirana
Salzburg
Veliko Tarnovo
Tallinn
Vilnius
Cracow
Zagreb
 
Featured articles
Backpacking in Eastern Europe
More Brits heading overseas this summer
Turkey makes for an ideal sun holiday
The most diversely exciting nightlife: Budapest
Increasing Popularity with Holidays to Turkey
Eastern Europe tours
Eastern Europe Top Destinations
Caribbean Cruise Vacations
Rincon of the Seas Grand Caribbean Hotel
Brickell Bay Beach Resort
Turks and Caicos Top Resorts
Vacation Packages: Are You Really Getting a Good Deal?
Prague: is it still our favourite city getaway
Some of the most impressive hotels in Europe
Europe most charming destinations
Privacy and Disclaimer
Privacy Policy
Disclaimer
 

Copyright ©2008 MarvaoGuide.com All rights reserved. Contact: info@marvaoguide.com
MarvaoGuide – Your travel guide to Central and Eastern Europe. Eastern Europe Travel