MarvaoGuide
Travel Guide to Eastern Europe
 
Eastern Europe Travel Guide   
MarvaoGuide.com - Travel Guide to Central and Eastern Europe
You are here: Eastern Europe Travel arrow Romania arrow Brief History of Romania  
 
Print E-mail

Brief History of Romania



 

Since about 200 B.C., when it was settled by the Dacians, a Thracian tribe, Romania has been in the path of a series of migrations and conquests. Under the emperor Trajan early in the second century A.D., Dacia was incorporated into the Roman Empire, but was abandoned by a declining Rome less than two centuries later. Romania disappeared from recorded history for hundreds of years, to reemerge in the medieval period as the Principalities of Moldavia and Wallachia. Heavily taxed and badly administered under the Ottoman Empire, the two Principalities were unified under a single native prince in 1859, and had their full independence ratified in the 1878 Treaty of Berlin. A German prince, Carol of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, was crowned first King of Romania in 1881.

The new state, squeezed between the Ottoman, Austro-Hungarian, and Russian empires, looked to the West, particularly France, for its cultural, educational, and administrative models. Romania was an ally of the Entente and the U.S. in World War I, and was granted substantial territories with Romanian populations, notably Transylvania, Bessarabia, and Bukovina, after the war.

Most of Romania's pre-World War II governments maintained the forms, but not always the substance, of a liberal constitutional monarchy. The fascist Iron Guard movement, exploiting a quasi-mystical nationalism, fear of communism, and resentment of alleged foreign and Jewish domination of the economy, was a key destabilizing factor, which led to the creation of a royal dictatorship in 1938 under King Carol II. In 1940, the authoritarian General Antonescu took control. Romania entered World War II on the side of the Axis Powers in June 1941, invading the Soviet Union to recover Bessarabia and Bukovina, which had been annexed in 1940.

In August 1944, a coup led by King Michael, with support from opposition politicians and the army, deposed the Antonescu dictatorship and put Romania's battered armies on the side of the Allies. Romania incurred additional heavy casualties fighting alongside the Soviet Union against the Germans in Transylvania, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia.

According to the officially recognized 2004 Wiesel Commission report, Romanian authorities were responsible for the death of between 280,000 and 380,000 Romanian and Ukrainian Jews in the territories under Romanian jurisdiction (including Bessarabia, Bukovina, and Transnistria) out of a population of approximately 760,000. In addition, 132,000 Romanian Jews were killed by the pro-Nazi Hungarian authorities in Transylvania.

A peace treaty, signed in Paris on February 10, 1947, confirmed the Soviet annexation of Bessarabia and northern Bukovina, but restored the part of northern Transylvania granted to Hungary in 1940 by Hitler. The treaty also required massive war reparations by Romania to the Soviet Union, whose occupying forces left in 1958.

The Soviets pressed for inclusion of Romania's heretofore negligible Communist Party in the post-war government, while non-communist political leaders were steadily eliminated from political life. King Michael abdicated under pressure in December 1947, when the Romanian People's Republic was declared, and went into exile.

By the late 1950s, Romania's communist government began to assert some independence from the Soviet Union. Nicolae Ceausescu became head of the Communist Party in 1965 and head of state in 1967. Ceausescu's denunciation of the 1968 Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia and a brief relaxation in internal repression helped give him a positive image both at home and in the West. Seduced by Ceausescu's "independent" foreign policy, Western leaders were slow to turn against a regime that, by the late 1970s, had become increasingly harsh, arbitrary, and capricious. Rapid economic growth fueled by foreign credits gradually gave way to economic autarchy accompanied by wrenching austerity and severe political repression.

After the collapse of communism in the rest of Eastern Europe in the late summer and fall of 1989, a mid-December protest in Timisoara against the forced relocation of an ethnic Hungarian pastor grew into a country-wide protest against the Ceausescu regime, sweeping the dictator from power. Ceausescu and his wife were executed on December 25, 1989, after a cursory military trial. About 1,500 people were killed in confused street fighting. An impromptu governing coalition, the National Salvation Front (FSN), installed itself and proclaimed the restoration of democracy and freedom. The Communist Party was dissolved and its assets transferred to the state. Ceausescu's most unpopular measures, such as bans on private commercial entities and independent political activity, were repealed. Presidential and parliamentary elections were held on May 20, 1990.

 
Advertisement
 

Menu
Eastern Europe Travel
Albania
Austria
Belarus
Bosnia
Bulgaria
Croatia
Czech Republic
Estonia
Hungary
Latvia
Lithuania
Macedonia
Moldova
Montenegro
Poland
Romania
Serbia
Slovakia
Slovenia
Turkey
Ukraine
Backpacking
World travel
Eastern Europe car hire
TOP 25 Eastern Europe
Vienna
Prague
Budapest
Sofia
Ljubljana
Riga
Dubrovnik
Warsaw
Bratislava
Bran Castle
Kotor
Berat
Cesky Krumlov
Bardejov
Belgrade
Budva
Sarajevo
Košice
Tirana
Salzburg
Veliko Tarnovo
Tallinn
Vilnius
Cracow
Zagreb
 
Featured articles
Backpacking in Eastern Europe
More Brits heading overseas this summer
Turkey makes for an ideal sun holiday
The most diversely exciting nightlife: Budapest
Increasing Popularity with Holidays to Turkey
Eastern Europe tours
Eastern Europe Top Destinations
Caribbean Cruise Vacations
Rincon of the Seas Grand Caribbean Hotel
Brickell Bay Beach Resort
Turks and Caicos Top Resorts
Vacation Packages: Are You Really Getting a Good Deal?
Prague: is it still our favourite city getaway
Some of the most impressive hotels in Europe
Europe most charming destinations
Privacy and Disclaimer
Privacy Policy
Disclaimer
 

Copyright ©2008 MarvaoGuide.com All rights reserved. Contact: info@marvaoguide.com
MarvaoGuide – Your travel guide to Central and Eastern Europe. Eastern Europe Travel