Sarajevo, nestled in a valley stretching in an east-west direction along the banks of the Miljacka River, has a population of 400 thousand. Capital of Bosnia-Hercegovina, Sarajevo is the meeting place of diverse cultures.

Although the city’s silhouette is dominated by the outlines of Moslem mosques and minarets, Catholic and Orthodox churches, not to mention Jewish synagogues, can also be seen.

Unfortunately, instead of remaining the symbol of the ability of peoples of different races being able to understand each other and live amicably together, Sarajevo, as a result of the racial conflicts in the area in the 1990’s, has become instead the symbol of senseless and incomprehensible brutality.

The traces of the devastation caused by the conflict have, by now, been effaced; however the ruins of some buildings can still be seen as a reminder.

Sarajevo, Capital of Bosnia Herzegovina

Sarajevo, Capital of Bosnia Herzegovina

Ferhadija Street, the city’s pedestrian mall, is today lined with charming cafés, restaurants and shops sporting world-famous brands. The city’s most fascinating area is Baščaršija, the bazaar quarter, in whose shops all the goods normally to be found in a Moslem bazaar can be found.

One of the grandest structures in the city is the large mosque of Gazi Husrev Bey, built in the 16th century. Sarajevo’s old Serb-Orthodox church dates from the 14th century.

Sarajevo, Old Town

Sarajevo, Old Town

The hills above the city provide excellent panoramic views. As some of the area around Sarajevo formed part of the front-lines during the conflict, there may still be undiscovered mines in the ground – hence one needs to be very careful away from the main routes.