Brief history of Croatia

In 1868, Croatia gained domestic autonomy while remaining under Hungarian authority. Following World War I and the demise of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Croatia joined the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes (the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes became Yugoslavia in 1929).

The Croats are believed to be a purely Slavic people who migrated from Ukraine and settled in present-day Croatia during the 6th century. After a period of self-rule, Croatians agreed to the Pacta Conventa in 1091, submitting themselves to Hungarian authority. By the mid-1400s, concerns over Ottoman expansion led the Croatian Assembly to invite the Habsburgs, under Archduke Ferdinand, to assume control over Croatia. Habsburg rule proved successful in thwarting the Ottomans, and by the 18th century, much of Croatia was free of Turkish control. Continue reading “Brief history of Croatia” »

Dubrovnik port among the top 10 World Ports

In terms of Mediterranean ports only Naples and Livorno have more visitors than Dubrovnik. The fact that five of the top ten world most visited embarkation ports are from the Mediterranean (Barcelona, Civitavecchia, Piraeus, Venice and Palma), is also very important and it confirms the extent to which cruise tourism is significant for this area.

In the autumn edition of the Dream World Cruise Destinations magazine, there is a list of the 50 most visited world ports, and Dubrovnik is in tenth place according to the number of transit passengers on a cruise. Continue reading “Dubrovnik port among the top 10 World Ports” »