If you are in Paris and wish to travel from quai des Tuileries to quai d’Orsay, there are two options open for you. You can either opt for a boat or you can cross the River Seine that separates these two points via the Pont de la Concorde. This is just one of the several names by which this bridge was known in the past and some of the others include pont Louis XVI and pont de la Revolution.

The planning of this bridge, which was commissioned in 1787, took place in the year 1755 and architect Jean-Rudolphe Perronet was roped in for the same. Visitors will be surprised to learn that a part of the masonry of the original was sourced from a damaged Bastille Saint-Antoine.

The year 1810 saw the placement, by Napoleon I, of the statues of eight French generals by the side of the bridge. Twelve monumental marble statues replaced these during the Burbon restoration. Since the bridge could not bear the load of these statues, they were later on removed. The width of this bridge was increased by double between 1930-1932.

However, care was taken by the engineers Malet and Deval to retain the neo-classical architecture of the original. If you wish to visit it, and you better do, you can opt for the metro with two of its stations, Concorde and Assemblee nationale being located near it.